Start Risf factors in teen dating violence

Risf factors in teen dating violence

Since violence between married partners has been linked consistently to patterns of antisocial behavior, investigation of overlap between delinquency, aggression, and dating violence is of interest, especially since both partner violence and antisocial behavior are most prevalent during adolescence and early adulthood. Data gathered in the context of criminal victimization by the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) show low estimates in general, and much higher estimates of victimization reported by teenage females (12.4%) compared to teenage males (1.2%).

Initially, focus on violence between intimate partners was placed exclusively on violence between married partners since it was believed that dating violence, particularly among teenagers, was rare or inconsequential.

In the last decade it has become clear that it is neither, as national studies have established more accurate estimates of prevalence and correlates.

Further, the author explains, many adolescents have difficulty recognizing physical and sexual abuse as such and may perceive controlling and jealous behaviors as signs of love.

In her review, the author focuses on two key purposes: (1) to provide a critical review of the dating violence literature with respect to potential risk factors for both perpetrators and victims; and (2) to examine the empirical research regarding the effectiveness of prevention and intervention programs targeting teen dating violence.

Differences in estimates across studies are due to many factors, including different samples, varying confidentiality of responses, time frames, and instrumentation.

The most widely used measure to survey partner violence is the Conflict Tactics Scales developed by Murray Straus, which assess the occurrence and frequency of a range of violent behaviors during arguments, ranging from hitting to injuring with a weapon.

Another national estimate of adolescents in high school indicated that almost one third of respondents report experiencing some lifetime dating violence, including psychological and physical violence, again with similar rates for males and females.

Other studies of dating violence have reported even higher prevalence rates of some violence in a current dating relationship.

However, these behaviors can become abusive and develop into more serious forms of violence.

Teen dating violence [PDF 187KB] is defined as the physical, sexual, psychological, or emotional violence within a dating relationship, including stalking. Teen dating violence (physical and sexual) among US high school students: Findings from the 2013 National Youth Risk Behavior Survey. As teens develop emotionally, they are heavily influenced by experiences in their relationships.

The author of this 13-page paper provides a critical review of the dating violence literature with respect to potential risk factors for both perpetrators and victims.