Start Validating xml parser c

Validating xml parser c

Note the "throws Exception" wimp-out; real applications would need real error handling: We can use this object to parse XML documents, but first, we have to register event handlers that the parser can use for reporting information, using the set Content Handler and set Error Handler methods from the XMLReader interface. Things get interesting when you start implementing methods to respond to XML parsing events (remember that we registered our class to receive XML parsing events in the previous section).

Now, let's assume that all of the command-line args are file names, and we'll try to parse them one-by-one using the parse method from the XMLReader interface: import To find out about the start and end of the document, the client application implements the start Document and end Document methods: method once (even if there have been errors). Default Handler; public class My SAXApp extends Default Handler Start document Start element: poem Characters: "\n" Start element: title Characters: "Roses are Red" End element: title Characters: "\n" Start element: l Characters: "Roses are red," End element: l Characters: "\n" Start element: l Characters: "Violets are blue;" End element: l Characters: "\n" Start element: l Characters: "Sugar is sweet," End element: l Characters: "\n" Start element: l Characters: "And I love you." End element: l Characters: "\n" End element: poem End document Note that even this short document generates (at least) 25 events: one for the start and end of each of the six elements used (or, if you prefer, one for each start tag and one for each end tag), one of each of the eleven chunks of character data (including whitespace between elements), one for the start of the document, and one for the end.

These examples simply print a message to standard output, but your application can contain any arbitrary code in these handlers: most commonly, the code will build some kind of an in-memory tree, produce output, populate a database, or extract information from the XML stream. If the input document did not include the Start document Start element: poem Characters: "\n" Start element: title Characters: "Roses are Red" End element: title Characters: "\n" Start element: l Characters: "Roses are red," End element: l Characters: "\n" Start element: l Characters: "Violets are blue;" End element: l Characters: "\n" Start element: l Characters: "Sugar is sweet," End element: l Characters: "\n" Start element: l Characters: "And I love you." End element: l Characters: "\n" End element: poem End document You will most likely work with both types of documents: ones using XML namespaces, and ones not using them.

Structured collections of annotated linguistic data are essential in most areas of NLP, however, we still face many obstacles in using them.

The goal of this chapter is to answer the following questions: Along the way, we will study the design of existing corpora, the typical workflow for creating a corpus, and the lifecycle of corpus.

TIMIT was developed by a consortium including Texas Instruments and MIT, from which it derives its name.

It was designed to provide data for the acquisition of acoustic-phonetic knowledge and to support the development and evaluation of automatic speech recognition systems.

HTML and regex go together like love, marriage, and ritual infanticide. The force of regex and HTML together in the same conceptual space will destroy your mind like so much watery putty.